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Starting Mammograms at age 40 saves lives, but The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends starting mammograms at age 50.
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Beginning Breast Cancer Screening at 50 Misses 20 Percent of Cancers

Delaying breast cancer screening until age 50 misses 20 percent of breast cancers, according to a study published by the American Journal of Roentgenology. The study examined 32,762 mammograms from women aged 40-79, as well as their prognosis and attendant risk factors. Of that group, 808 women received biopsies and 224 were diagnosed with breast cancer. Though the majority of breast cancers were found in women over 50, 18.8 percent were found in women 40-49.

Breast Cancer Controversy

This finding contradicts the breast cancer screening guidelines issued by the United States Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF), a government panel that recommends medical practices to doctors and healthcare groups. In 2016, they […]

What Age To Stop Mammographic Screening

One question that I commonly hear from my patients is “At what age can a woman stop having a screening mammogram?” Although there is not a simple answer to this question, there is now enough information about this subject for a woman to make an informed decision about herself or her aging relatives.

First, let’s start with the good news. Multiple well-designed scientific studies have demonstrated a 30-40 percent reduction in breast cancer mortality in women who do yearly mammograms. Things will get even better in the future as we move more towards aggressively screening high-risk women and women with dense breasts. Most of the information on the value of screening […]

Personalized Care & Breast Cancer Screening: A Response to Revised ACS Guidelines

Middle Aged Woman Getting Mammogram

Breast cancer is a common and still lethal disease in the United States. More than 230,000 are likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and it is expected to claim more than 40,000 lives.[1] Early detection of breast cancer saves lives and can minimize treatment.

Earlier this year, Breastlink responded to updated U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations to delay screening mammography until age 50 by emphatically detailing the potential harms of delaying a cancer diagnosis. These harms include increased toxicity of chemotherapy, more extensive surgery and a higher risk of lymphedema, as well […]

USPSTF Recommendations Ignore Reality of Breast Cancer

Annual mammogram screening beginning at age 40 saves lives. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends less frequent screening at a later age, not because screening will not save lives, but because it will not save sufficient numbers of lives when started before age 50.

The guidelines are based on outdated, blemished data and do not evaluate cost-effectiveness or any other benefits of early detection. In fact, USPSTF states, “Screening mammography in women ages 40 to 49 years may reduce the risk of dying of breast cancer, but the number of deaths averted is much smaller than in older women and the number of false-positive tests and unnecessary biopsies are larger.”[…]

Canadian Mammography Screening Study

Following the recent Canadian study published about mammography screening I remain convinced that young women should strongly consider mammographic screening on an annual basis.

Mammography Screening Studies

The recent Canadian study on mammography screening has sparked a major controversy. On the surface, it was an impressive study that included more than 50,000 women who were followed for 25 years.1 It concluded that women between the ages of 40 and 49 receive no benefit from mammographic screening.

These findings are in direct contrast to a larger study from Sweden, which demonstrated a major survival advantage for women in the same age group who underwent routine screening.2

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